Difference between revisions of "Writing system images"

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m (Terminal only)
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# Start the "Terminal"
 
# Start the "Terminal"
 
# Possibly "cd" to the location of the system image file, or put the file in our user's home folder
 
# Possibly "cd" to the location of the system image file, or put the file in our user's home folder
# Run <tt>distil list</tt>
+
# Run <tt>diskutil list</tt>
 
# Connect the disk (USB stick, CompactFlash, etc)
 
# Connect the disk (USB stick, CompactFlash, etc)
# Run <tt>distil list</tt> again, and notice the new device that appears (e.g. /dev/'''disk1''')
+
# Run <tt>diskutil list</tt> again, and notice the new device that appears (e.g. /dev/'''disk1''')
 
# Run <tt>diskutil unmountDisk /dev/'''disk1'''</tt> (if it fails, use the "Disk Utility" above)
 
# Run <tt>diskutil unmountDisk /dev/'''disk1'''</tt> (if it fails, use the "Disk Utility" above)
 
# Run <tt>gzcat halon-vsr-serial-amd64-3.0p33.img.gz | sudo dd bs=16k of=/dev/'''disk1'''</tt>
 
# Run <tt>gzcat halon-vsr-serial-amd64-3.0p33.img.gz | sudo dd bs=16k of=/dev/'''disk1'''</tt>
Note that "sudo" is needed on 10.8 (Mountain Lion) or later, which will make the system ask for your user's (or administrator) password.  
+
Note that "sudo" is needed on 10.8 (Mountain Lion) or later, which will make the system ask for your user's (or administrator) password.
  
 
== Linux/BSD ==
 
== Linux/BSD ==

Revision as of 10:18, 30 December 2013

The VSR software is shipped as software images; that is, a complete clone of a system disk. Installing the VSR is as simple as downloading an appropriate file from http://dl2.halon.se/vsr/ and writing it to disk such as a USB stick or CompactFlash. For more information, see the getting started page.

Mac OS X

  1. Connect the disk (USB stick, CompactFlash, etc)
  2. Start the "Disk Utility"
    • Select the disk
    • Press "Unmount" (if possible)
    • Press "Info" to find the "Disk Identifier" something like disk1
  3. Start the "Terminal"
    • Possibly "cd" to the location of the system image file, or put the file in our user's home folder
    • Run gzcat halon-vsr-serial-amd64-3.0p33.img.gz | sudo dd bs=16k of=/dev/disk1

Terminal only

  1. Start the "Terminal"
  2. Possibly "cd" to the location of the system image file, or put the file in our user's home folder
  3. Run diskutil list
  4. Connect the disk (USB stick, CompactFlash, etc)
  5. Run diskutil list again, and notice the new device that appears (e.g. /dev/disk1)
  6. Run diskutil unmountDisk /dev/disk1 (if it fails, use the "Disk Utility" above)
  7. Run gzcat halon-vsr-serial-amd64-3.0p33.img.gz | sudo dd bs=16k of=/dev/disk1

Note that "sudo" is needed on 10.8 (Mountain Lion) or later, which will make the system ask for your user's (or administrator) password.

Linux/BSD

  1. Connect the disk (USB stick, CompactFlash, etc)
  2. Run as root gzcat halon-vsr-serial-amd64-3.0p33.img.gz | dd bs=16k of=/dev/sdb

Note that the path to the file can be relative, and that sdb should be your inserted USB disk

Microsoft Windows

Microsoft Windows does not ship tools for uncompressing .gz files, however free tools are available such as 7-Zip. The uncompressed file should be written to a block device (such as a USB stick or CF disk) using Image Writer for Windows, which provides a graphical way of doing so.